PIJAlance Magazine
The Patriot Institute of Journalism and Arts (PIJA), Lance Magazine is a public-centric independent media organisation dedicated to fighting injustice, fostering social justice and community development through the telling and retelling of the marginalised-oriented stories.

Unlocking the Power of Event Boundaries: How to Improve Memory and Prevent Short-term Forgetfulness

1

Chioma Mboho, ChatGPT

 

“I know I came in here for something, but I can’t remember what it is …”

 

If you’ve ever said something like this, you’ve probably experienced an “event boundary.” Many, if not all, of us have had the experience of walking into a room and forgetting exactly what it is we came in there to do.

 

The University of Notre Dame in Indiana recently conducted a study on this phenomenon, concluding that walking through doorways causes memory to lapse. As researcher Gabriel Radvansky explained: “Entering or exiting through a doorway serves as an ‘event boundary’ in the mind, which separates episodes of activity and files them away.”

 

That means that by the time you’re staring blankly at the kitchen counter, your brain has already moved on from the thought that led you in there, and you can’t always effectively backtrack. “Recalling the decision or activity that was made in a different room is difficult because it has been compartmentalized,” Radvansky said.

 

A few suggestions for breaking through event boundaries, on behalf of NewsFeed: mentally repeat the decision or action as you enter the room, announce what you’re about to do, or move to a one-room apartment.

 

Breakdown

 

Event boundaries refer to the beginning and end of a specific event or occurrence. In psychology, event boundaries can play a significant role in how we perceive and remember events.

 

One psychological theory of event boundaries is the “event file hypothesis,” proposed by psychologist Robert Bjork in 1994. According to this theory, our brains create a separate file or “memory episode” for each distinct event we experience. The boundaries of an event help to define when one memory episode ends and another begins. This can play a crucial role in how well we are able to remember and recall specific events.

 

For example, imagine you are at a concert and the band plays two songs that you really enjoy. However, the concert-goers around you are talking loudly and disrupting your experience. According to the event file hypothesis, the loud talking would be considered a separate event from the music, and thus the boundaries of the concert-goers’ talking would be different from the boundaries of the music. As a result, you might remember the music more clearly and be able to recall it more easily than the loud talking.

 

Another psychological theory related to event boundaries is the “flashbulb memory” theory, proposed by cognitive psychologists Roger Brown and James Kulik in 1977. This theory suggests that certain highly emotional or significant events can be encoded into our memories with great detail and accuracy, creating a “flashbulb” memory that is clear and long-lasting. Examples of such events include the 9/11 terrorist attacks or the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

 

It’s important to note that event boundaries are not always clear-cut and can be influenced by various factors such as an individual’s perspective, emotions and prior knowledge. For example, two people may have different boundaries for the same event based on their unique perspectives and experiences.

 

In summary, event boundaries play a significant role in how we perceive and remember events. Theories such as the event file hypothesis and flashbulb memory theory help to explain the importance of event boundaries in our memories. It’s also important to remember that event boundaries are not always clear-cut and can be influenced by a variety of factors.

 

 

Event boundaries and forgetfulness

 

Event boundaries can play a role in short-term forgetfulness, or the inability to recall recently learned information. When an event boundary is not clearly defined, it can make it more difficult for our brains to separate and distinguish different pieces of information. This can lead to confusion and difficulty in recalling specific details.

Unlocking the Power of Event Boundaries: How to Improve Memory and Prevent Short-term Forgetfulness

For example, imagine you are at a lecture and the speaker discusses several different topics. However, the speaker does not clearly indicate when one topic ends and another begins, making it difficult for your brain to create distinct memory episodes for each topic. As a result, you may have a harder time recalling specific details from the lecture later on.

 

Additionally, when an event is highly emotional or stressful, it can cause us to focus our attention on the emotions rather than the information being presented. This can also lead to difficulty in recalling specific details later on. The flashbulb memory theory suggests that such high-emotion events can lead to a very clear and long-lasting memory, but it also means that other less emotional information related to the event might be forgotten.

 

Furthermore, the theory of cognitive load suggests that our working memory capacity is limited and when it is overloaded with too much information, it can lead to short-term forgetfulness. Clear event boundaries can help to reduce cognitive load and make it easier for our brains to process and retain information.

 

In conclusion, event boundaries can play a role in short-term forgetfulness by affecting our ability to create distinct memory episodes and recall specific details. It’s important to have clear event boundaries to help our brains process and retain information efficiently.

 

 

Can event boundaries prevent forgetfulness?

 

Event boundaries can play a role in helping to prevent forgetfulness by allowing our brains to create distinct memory episodes for each event. When event boundaries are clearly defined, it can make it easier for our brains to process and retain information, thus reducing the likelihood of forgetfulness.

 

For example, when studying for an exam, if the material is separated into distinct topics and each topic is clearly defined by event boundaries, it can make it easier for the brain to process and retain the information. This can lead to improved recall of the material during the exam.

 

When event boundaries are clearly defined, it can reduce cognitive load on the working memory, which is responsible for temporarily holding and processing information. When cognitive load is high, it can lead to forgetfulness.

 

However, it’s important to note that event boundaries alone cannot completely prevent forgetfulness. Other factors such as the individual’s prior knowledge, attention, and motivation also play a role in how well information is encoded and retrieved from memory.

 

Event boundaries can play a role in helping to prevent forgetfulness by allowing our brains to create distinct memory episodes and reducing cognitive load. But, other factors also influence the ability to recall information.

 

Read Also:Remedy to Dying Every Day With Depression Triggered by Loneliness

We stand to tell stories connecting the masses to justice and development. We always rebel against social injustice. Got a story you'll like us to publish, tip us in contact us.

1 Comment
  1. gate io says

    I may need your help. I’ve been doing research on gate io recently, and I’ve tried a lot of different things. Later, I read your article, and I think your way of writing has given me some innovative ideas, thank you very much.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More

Privacy & Cookies Policy